Exposing the “Digital ID is a Human Right” Scam

Exposing the “Digital ID is a Human Right” Scam

by Derrick Broze, Activist Post:

A major component of the Great Reset-Technocratic Agenda is the implementation of a worldwide digital identity scheme. One of the first steps to realize this goal is to convince the public that digital identity programs are a “human right” worth fighting for.

Why is the push for digital identity absolutely vital to the Technocrats’ visions?

The world of 2030 — the one in which the World Economic Forum imagines “you will own nothing and be happy” — depends on an all-encompassing digital ID program. This digital ID will allow a track-and-trace society where the authorities can see every purchase and every move you make.

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One could argue that much of society has already handed over this data with the ubiquitous use of credit cards which track purchases, and phones which log GPS data. However, the digital ID scheme will also be linked to a digital wallet holding the local Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC), the digital currency of governments which will be needed for all legal transactions. Eventually, this digital ID and the digital wallet will be connected to, and impacted by, your individual social credit score.

As I have reported since March 2020, these initiatives were already in the works prior to COVID-19. However, it was the beginning of the COVID-19 panic that allowed governments around the world to push further towards their vision of Technocracy. For example, we have been told that use of cash should be greatly reduced or eliminated altogether because of reports claiming COVID-19 spread through dirty old money. This conveniently leads into the calls for digital currency programs such as CBDCs.

Of course, we see the push for “contact tracing” apps to track the alleged spread of disease, and vaccine passport/health passport apps have begun to acclimate the public to carrying a digital ID card with them everywhere they go. The vaccine passport is simply a gateway to a digital identity which has already been in the works in the United States, to one degree or another, since at least 2005 with the passing of the controversial REAL ID Act.

UN Sustainable Development Goal 16

This push towards a digital identity has its roots in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the 2030 Agenda. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 interlinked objectives adopted by the United Nations in 2015 with the ostensible goal of ending poverty, protecting the planet, and spreading peace and prosperity to all people by 2030. Their actions, however, regularly belie their stated intentions.

The SDGs were part of a larger resolution known as the 2030 Agenda, or Agenda 2030, with the stated purpose of fighting climate change. While the United Nations SDGs and Agenda 2030 are often touted as a tool for establishing healthy multilateral relationships between nations, in truth, they are based in a deeper agenda to monitor, control, and direct all life on the planet.

The 17 SDGs each tackle a different area of their ostensible fight for justice and equality. UN SDG 16 focuses on “Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions” and states that “by 2030, provide legal identity for all, including birth registration.”

One document from the United Nations titled “United Nations Strategy for Legal Identity for All” further defines what is meant by “legal” and “digital identity.” A legal identity is essentially a form of registration with a civil body (a government). The UN document makes it clear that “legal identity is widely acknowledged to be catalytic for achieving at least ten of the SDGs“, and the data generated by the registration supports the measurement of more than 60 SDG indicators. “Legal identity has a critical role to ensure the global community upholds its promise of leaving no one behind as espoused in the 2030 Agenda,” the UN report states.

When it comes to digital identity, the document says digital identity is generally understood as a unique and constant identity — a virtual identification card, for example — assigned to individuals that authenticates them as users of all their portable digital devices. This identity can apply to the digital and physical worlds. Using a digital identity involves passwords, cryptographic key, biometrics such as fingerprint or iris scanning.

Digital Identity as a Human Right

As we approach 2030 the “digital identity as a human right” meme is increasingly being planted in the minds of the masses. I would expect this trend to become a standard talking point amongst corporate media hacks and their followers. Not only is the public being primed to accept digital identity as a method of tracking illness (and the population), but digital identity is being sold to the bleeding hearts of the Western world as a necessity for helping the so-called “unbanked” of the world and bringing them into modern financial systems.

The term unbanked refers to those people who, for one reason or another, lack bank accounts and credit cards. This apparent lack is often reported as a flaw of modern society, an example of another poor population being left behind. What goes unquestioned is whether integration into the banking system is the best thing for an individual or not. It is assumed that all people should need or want to be involved in the debt based banking system, allowing the criminal banks behind The Great Reset to fund their projects with the people’s money.

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Many of these people live in the developing world, and in places like Mexico, there exists a thriving counter or informal economy of people trading, buying, and selling goods without taxes, regulations, or a digital record of any kind. This type of economic and social activity is the exact behavior the Technocrats want to eliminate, precisely because it flies in the face of the Great Reset vision.

Thus the media must do its job to convince the public that colonization is not colonization when it involves sustainability and diversity. The people need to be convinced that those poor Mexican farmers won’t be complete until they have a digital ID, with a digital wallet for receiving the digital currency as part of the Universal Basic Income program. These gushing stories promoting digital identity as the savior of the developing world fail to mention the dark side to the digitization of all life, specifically the coming terror of social credit and social impact finance tools.

Instead we get headlines like, “Digital Inclusion. The Human Right to Have an Identity” from the Thales Group, a French multinational with ties to the French government and one of the largest military weapons contractors in the world. “The lack of identity is not just a loss in terms of being seen by the system and society. It is an exclusion that prevents people from achieving their full potential. They cannot be educated, they cannot access healthcare services, and their children inherit this legacy as they’re born outside the system,” the group wrote in February 2021. Again, the general assumption is that there is no life to be had “outside the system”.

Meanwhile, Impakter Magazine, known for promoting the SDGs, published a piece titled “Digital Identity As a Basic Human Right” in May 2018. The Impakter piece promotes blockchain based IDs and putting children’s birth certificates on the blockchain as well.

Thankfully there are some examples of pushback to the commonly held narratives surrounding digital ID.

In April 2021, the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice published a skeptical piece titled “Everyone Counts! Ensuring that the human rights of all are respected in digital ID systems.” This article looked at some of the ways marginalized populations are further marginalized by digital systems. They warn of the “need for the human rights movement to engage in discussions about digital transformation so that fundamental rights are not lost in the rush to build a ‘modern, digital state’.”

The group Access Now published a report, Busting the dangerous myths of Big ID programs: cautionary lessons from India, which focused on the concerns surrounding India’s implementation of their digital ID system Aadhaar. The report concludes that so-called “Big ID programs” — that is programs implemented by governments with the help of Big Tech — are not needed to give people a legal identity. Further, the report found that Big ID creates space for surveillance to flourish, as demonstrated by India’s Aadhaar system.

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